NHK Haiku Masters Gallery

snow feather

Image & haiku: Sandra Simpson

My ‘photo haiku’ (as NHK Haiku Masters calls them) has been chosen as a runner-up for week 2 this month and Kazuko Nishimura had this to say:

For farmers, the radio weather forecast is a part of daily life that plays a heavy role in deciding how each day unfolds. However, sometimes just looking out the window can be more accurate than any weather report. The word “snow” used in the final line can also refer to the radio static that occurs during a bad storm, when radio reception is hard to come by. This piece has done a great job at presenting a specific slice of life many of us can relate to.

Usually there is no theme, but for this one they wanted something ‘seasonal’ for Christmas-New Year-winter. See the full gallery here.

The image was taken at a close-up photography workshop and is of a peacock feather in a glass container full of heavily salted water, the idea of our tutor Kim Westerskov. I placed my camera lens against the glass and later manipulated the contrast and colours to achieve this effect.

You don’t have to be a photographer to join the fun – NHK Haiku Masters also offers a photo as a prompt for haiku.

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A friendly free library

The Little Free Library movement began in the United States in 2009 when a Wisconsin man built one to honour his late mother who had loved books and, despite some carping by city officials in the Los Angeles and Shreveport areas, it’s still going strong. (I previously posted about finding one in Prairie City, Oregon, and adding my book of haiku.)

I was following the ‘5 Rules of Travel Photography’ suggested by ace Tauranga photographer Kim Westerskov when in Natanz, Iran recently:

  • Photograph what you came to see (the Jame Mosque)
  • Shoot context
  • Shoot detail
  • Shoot people
  • Turn around and see what’s behind you …
natanz-jamemosque

What we came to see: The portal of the Jame Mosque in Natanz is dated 1317 but the rest of the mosque mainly dates from the post-Mongol period of about 1450-1500. Photo: Sandra Simpson

I turned around and saw a red-and-white-sign on a wall announcing in English: Armaghan’s Free Friendly Library. Beneath the sign was a beautifully painted metal cabinet, the sort found in many schools and offices, that when opened contained shelves of books! Well done, that person (or indeed, business) and I’m sorry I can’t tell you any more about it.

Photo: Sandra Simpson

WordPress, by the way, is one of the several sites blocked in Iran, hence a lack of updates as I travelled.